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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
you for your time this evening. the absurd drama of the sow called fiscal cliff negotiations and the best investment out there. that's ahead on "viewpoint." as i looked out across the battlefield at antietam. i saw the future of one great nation. but only barely, because the sun was like, way in my grill. george mcclellan, the general, hands me his pair of foster grant sunglasses, and i could see! my wife, mary todd, found them so fetching. >> he looked so fine i started to call him babe-raham lincoln. >> i was like, mary, please. >> you look like a baby, a literal child. i bought a pair online, shipped to 115 main st., that's my gettysburg address. i'm funny. i find them to be affordable frames, of the people, for the people, and, not, by the people, that's part of this freedom thing. end slavery, let people buy awesome sunglasses. who's behind those foster grants? abraham stinkin' lincoln. >> i came up with that slogan myself. view want the great bargain for the holiday season? i got one for you and it's the number of the day. two for one. that's the deal the co
event in pennsylvania to tout his proposal in the fiscal cliff negotiations saying that the american people made their economic wishes clear on the election day. >> obama: this was a central questions in the election. maybe the central question in the election. you remember. we talked about this a lot. at the end of the day a clear majority of americans--democrats republicans, independents--they agreed with a balanced. >> eliot: republicans meanwhile openly deride the president's proposal saying they're the ones taking negotiations seriously. >> the proposal that was delivered here by secretary geithner the speaker and me yesterday was not a serious proposal. >> i mean, it's--it's--it's--it was not a serious proposal. i think the debt crisis that we face requires us to make serious decisions. >> we're not playing a game. we're being serious. >> eliot: bottom line. let's hope there is a different script being played out behind the scenes. joining me now for some serious wisdom is staff reporter for mother jones andy kroll. thank you for joining me tonight. >> my pleasure. >> eliot: is
and this is "viewpoint." on this show we prefer to call it the fiscal cliff or the austerity bomb. either way the country is just 34 days away from the mix of hundreds of billions of dollars with expireing tax cuts. the president called on voters though pressure congress for a deal that would freeze taxes for 911%98% of for american families. >> call members of congress, write them, e-mail, post it on their facebook wall. tweet it by using the hash tag "my 2 k." >> if the latest "washington post" "abc news" poll is correct, the 06% 60% said they supported, and oklahoma congressman tom cole told politico last night, i quote i think we ought to take the 98% deal right now. it doesn't mean that i agree with raising the top two i don't. but house speaker john boehner disagreed with that call. >> i told him that i disagreed with him. >> eliot: he seemed more interesting in attacking the president than finding common ground. >> as the speaker said we have done our part. we have pup revenue on the table. we have not seen any good faith effort on the part of this administration to talk about the real problem tha
on with the fiscal cliff right? are we going to balance our budget by lessoning lessening the support to those with disability or focus on those at the top 1%. this trend is ongoing and i hope it doesn't continue. the bipartisan tradition around disability is longstanding, and i think it's mourn. it's one of those few issues that traditionally both republicans and democrats can agree on, and i hope we can get back to that point. a lot of work need to be done in the republican party for us to get there. >> eliot: your point is so well taken. there should be no disagreement about extending rights to those with disabilities. this is not a partisan issue. it has not been historically a partisan issue. whom will you call? where will you begin when you go and reach out to the republican party and say guys, go back to your roots. you just lost an election because of the narrowness of your vision. expand it. who will you talk to? >> you know what? i will talk to everyone and anyone who will listen. we work he very closely with former senator dole, and i couldn't believe as he was sitting there in the
." who is afraid of the big bad so-called fiscal cliff? maybe it should be termed the nice gradual fiscal slope. we've certainly heard a lot of ceos and other financial cassandras in recent weeks prove size doom if it a deal isn't cut by year's owned. but washington, both side have dug in their heels, and the answer may be that suddenly the sliding down the fiscal slope does not seem that bad. maybe that's why the republicans leaders like speaker of the house john boehner were able to put off making a counter proposal to the president's offer until today. crossing the red line on the talks by rejecting the demind that the republicans accept a hike in the marginal tax rate for those with income over a quarter million dollars a year. my view? obviously i agree with the white house on the substance and as i have said before, their hand gets stronger over time. but sometimes a new idea can change the dynamic. here is an idea that has been around for a long time, supported by james tobin way back and pushed by ralph nadar in a "washington post" op-ed this weekend. impose a tax on financial tra
the handwriting on the wall. >> eliot: for more on the fiscal cliff negotiations and today's confrontation, let's go to michael tomasky political correspondent. michael, this constitutes high drama by washington standards. any surprise that the president's proposal was outright rejected by speaker boehner? it was an "in your face" proposal to him. >> it was. i'm not surprised. i don't think any of us are surprised it was rejected. i think we're a little surprised, maybe a lot surprised it was put forward in the first place. this is really different. barack obama, this is a really different negotiating posture and position that he is starting from. if we look back to that horrible debt ceiling fiasco from last summer in 2011, i think we all remember how bleak that was that obama started his negotiating position really from a place that met the republicans more than halfway so he was going to be bound to end up meeting them in the final analysis. which is what happened. it was demoralizing. now, after re-election, he has b
there are other issues like the fiscal cliff that are predominant right now in the national debate, but you know, as i said, you mentioned swing states. legal guns polling most voters trust the president more than mitt romney on the issue of guns so you know you know, i think people are just waiting for him to take action. >> it was interesting and when he spoke of that it galvanized. when he spoke about same-sex marriage it shifted public opinion. i for one people that this is an issue ripe for him to take and grab and to move forward on. eric fascinating thing when cob costas used one of the bigger media platforms out there sunday night football, he got a lot of eyeballs, and not necessarily eyeballs who are going to be sympathetic to a gun control issue. i give bob costas a ton of credit. fair or not? >> he said he knew he was going to get criticized. no regrets. he's not going to be run off what he said. it's interesting when you have a sportscaster, both bob costas and jason whitlock. that's sad this is an epidemic. i think the mainstream press talk about the politics, i think the mainstrea
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)